Steps In Fulfilling Assignment Sequence

Dr. Howe
En 101

Steps in Fulfilling Assignment Sequence Writing About Images

Summarize an image

  1. Choose an image from the approved list—this image should strike you in some meaningful way, but it need not be positive. Try selecting an image that makes you uncomfortable!
  2. What do you first notice about it?
  3. What do you notice after looking at it for a while? Try to note down everything you see.
  4. What is the general subject of the image? Be general at first, but then try to think more conceptually.
  5. How is the space in the photograph used? Where is the camera located? What is the tone of the image—what do you think the photographer's attitude toward his/her subject is? Ask as many questions as you can about the image, about your relationship to it as a viewer, about the photographer's apparent goals.
  6. Write a 3-page descriptive—but objective—summary of this image, including both its content and its style. Your summary should have a descriptive thesis that organizes your thoughts—this thesis should lay out what the conceptual point of the image seems to be, or what the image seems to be “about.”

Summarize an essay about an image (these two might be reversed, but the first one is easier and more fun for students)

  1. Read and re-read, several times, the essay, taking as many notes as possible.
  2. Identify the general topic of the essay. This general topic might be hard to pin down at first; if you can't get to it at once, move on to #3 and then return to #2 when you get to the later stages.
  3. As you re-read, note down each topic the author addresses. Don't worry right now about what the author says about that point, but rather generate a list of specific topics that s/he touches on.
  4. Consider the tone of the essay—what strikes you about how it is written? What kind of attitude does the author seem to be taking toward his/her topic?
  5. What is the purpose of the essay? Why should we read it, why is the author writing it?
  6. Consider the organization of each essay—how is the essay organized, and why? What ideas does the author discuss first, second, third, and so on? Don't get bogged down inside of paragraphs, and remember that several paragraphs might be giving nuance on a single larger topic.
  7. Locate the thesis in the essay, and put it in your own words. You can flesh it out by adding subordinate clauses, descriptive phrases, and so on, based on your reading and notetaking.
  8. Begin drafting.
  9. Write an essay of 2-3 pages in which you summarize, as accurately and objectively as possible, the article's content and form. Your summary should have a descriptive thesis that accurately captures, in your own words, the central claim and purpose of the article.

Comparative analysis (essays about image alteration)

  1. Read and re-read, several times, the two essays
  2. Identify, as specifically as possible, the general topic of each essay.
  3. Imagine that these authors have read each other's work. Note down each topic you can think of that both authors address. Don't worry right now about what each says about that point, but rather generate a list of specific topics that both authors discuss.
  4. Consider the tone of each essay—what strikes you about how each is written? What kind of attitude does the author seem to be taking toward his/her topic?
  5. Consider the organization of each essay—how is the essay organized, and why? What ideas does the author discuss first, second, third, and so on? Don't get bogged down inside of paragraphs, and remember that several paragraphs might be giving nuance on a single larger topic.
  6. Locate the thesis in each essay, and put each in your own words. You can flesh them out by adding subordinate clauses, descriptive phrases, and so on.
  7. Start drafting from the work you've done above.
  8. Write a 3-4 page, thesis-driven essay in which you comparatively analyze these two authors' ideas. Your thesis should not be based on your opinion, but on what these two authors both do and how they do it differently. In your thesis, use a subordinate sentence structure to help you comparatively analyze: “Although both X and Y discuss Z, X thinks that Z is A and Y thinks that Z is B.”

Research project (famous images—general outline of process, fleshed out in assignment)

  1. What famous images are you aware of? (List) What makes them famous? Are they “iconic”? Discuss with your peers
  2. Personal narrative (this works as a part of the research project)
  3. Conducting research (carry a copy of the image with you at all times, along with a notebook in which you record your thoughts and others' responses)
  4. Outlining (what ideas can be grouped together, and why?)
  5. Drafting
  6. Revising
  7. Presenting
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